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Posts for category: Skin Condition

The sun’s penetrating rays can be unforgiving. Ultraviolet (UV) radiation from the sun is the main cause of skin cancer, the most common form of cancer in the United States. Every year, more people are diagnosed with skin cancer than the total number of all cancers.  But the sun isn’t alone in the blame. Tanning beds can also be harmful.

What Are the Most Common Skin Cancers?

The three main types of skin cancer are melanoma (which is the most serious type) and two nonmelanoma skin cancers - Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Both of these nonmelanoma skin cancers are usually very treatable, especially if caught early.

Who Can Get Skin Cancer?

People who have dark skin tones often believe they are not at risk for developing skin cancer, but that is a dangerous misconception. Although dark skin does not burn in the sun as easily as fair skin, everyone, no matter their race or ethnicity is at risk for skin cancer. That’s true even for people who don’t typically get sunburns. It does not matter if you consider your skin light, dark, or somewhere in the middle. You are at risk for skin cancer.

You can help lessen your risk of getting by taking precautions, such as regularly using sunscreen with an SPF of 30 or higher and making sure your sunscreen has UVA AND UVB protection.

What Are the Signs of Skin Cancer?

Skin cancer typically develops on areas of our bodies that are most often exposed to the sun: face, hands, arms, chest, neck, and legs. But it can also be found in other areas not associated with the sun, including beneath your fingernails or toenails, the palms of your hands, and the genital area.  The signs and symptoms of skin cancer vary according to the type of cancer, but usually include different spots or speckles, or a mole that changes in color or size. If you’re worried about any changes to your skin, make an appointment with one of our board-certified dermatologists.

Skin Cancer Treatment

Treatment options vary and will depend on the size and location of the lesion. Here at Feinstein Dermatology, we use a couple of effective treatments. One of them is Mohs surgery (microscopically controlled surgery). It’s a fairly minor surgery that’s performed under local anesthesia and done in stages in one visit in the comfort of our office.  We also perform the latest non-invasive treatment option for nonmelanoma skin cancer, a superficial radiation therapy technique called Superficial Radiation Therapy (SRT).

What is Superficial Radiation Therapy?

Superficial Radiation Therapy, a low energy form of x-ray technology is becoming more popular. The treatment uses very focused, low-doses of radiation that only penetrates the skin’s surface, effectively destroying these cancers.  The doses go only skin deep, which help minimize scarring and deep tissue damage.  It does not involve anesthesia or cutting.  Patients receive treatments about once or twice or week, over a series of weeks. There’s very little to no downtime.

Make an Appointment to See Us

If you’re looking for Delray Beach skin cancer treatments or for more information on Superficial Radiation Therapy (SRT), call us and make an appointment.  As a full-service skin care dermatology and cosmetic surgery center, we treat several skin conditions and offer the best cosmetic and anti-aging treatments in South Florida. We look forward to meeting you!

By Feinstein Dermatology
September 28, 2018
Category: Skin Condition
Tags: Shingles   Chickenpox  

Shingles is a painful conditionWhat are the symptoms of and treatments for this painful dermatological condition?

Did you know that anyone who has had chickenpox is at risk for shingles, and that those over the age of 50 are more likely to develop this condition? Approximately one out of three Americans will have shingles at some point in their lives. Read on to learn more about this common problem.

What is shingles?

Shingles is caused by a virus known as the varicella­zoster virus, which is the same virus known to cause chickenpox. If you’ve had chickenpox before the virus never truly goes away. Instead it lies dormant within the nerves of the spinal cord and brain. When the virus is reactivated, it manifests as shingles.

What are the symptoms of shingles?

The main symptom of shingles is a red, painful rash that usually appears on one side of the body. The rash may be tender to the touch and typically causes intense itching. The rash is made up of blisters that burst and crust over. Your rash may also be accompanied by malaise, fever, or headache.

What are the risk factors for shingles?

Anyone who has been infected by chickenpox can have shingles. However, this illness is more common in those over the age of 50 and the risk continues to increase as you age.

Also, those who have a weakened immune system due to certain chronic diseases like HIV, or those currently undergoing cancer treatment may be at an increased risk of developing shingles.

Different shingles treatments

While there is no cure for this disease there are antiviral medications you can take to promote faster healing and to reduce your risk of developing other complications. If you are experiencing severe pain, we may also recommend prescription pain medications or creams to help ease your symptoms. Most people experience shingles symptoms for about two to six weeks.

Can I prevent shingles?

There are two vaccines that we recommend for preventing shingles. The first is the chickenpox vaccine, which is recommended for children and any adults who have never had chickenpox. The second vaccine is the shingles vaccine. While these vaccines aren’t 100 percent effective, they can greatly reduce your chances of developing shingles.

If your shingles rash has developed near your eye or is severely painful, then it’s time to see your dermatologist right away for treatment.

By Feinstein Dermatology & Cosmetic Surgery
March 30, 2017
Category: Skin Condition
Tags: Rosacea  

Rosacea is a chronic skin condition of the face that affects an estimated 16 million Americans. Because rosacea is frequently misdiagnosed and confused with acne, sunburn or eye irritation, a large percentage of people suffering from rosacea fail to seek medical help due to lack of awareness.  It’s important to understand the warning signs of rosacea and need for treatment to make the necessary lifestyle changes and prevent the disorder from becoming progressively severe.

Although the exact cause of rosacea is unknown, you may be more susceptible to rosacea if:

  • You are fair-skinned
  • You blush easily
  • You are female
  • You have a family history of rosacea
  • You are between the ages of 30 and 50

A frequent source of social embarrassment, for many people rosacea affects more than just the face. Rosacea is a chronic skin disease, which means it lasts for a lifetime. Learning what triggers your rosacea is an important way to reduce flare-ups and manage symptoms. This may include avoiding stress, too much sunlight, heavy exercise, extreme temperatures and certain foods or beverages.

What Are the Symptoms of Rosacea?

Rosacea frequently causes the cheeks to have a flushed or red appearance. The longer rosacea goes untreated, the higher the potential for permanent redness of the cheeks, nose and forehead. Symptoms of rosacea will not be the same for every person. Common symptoms include:

  • Facial burning and stinging
  • Facial flushing and blush that evolves to persistent redness
  • Redness on the cheeks, nose, chin or forehead
  • Small, visible broken blood vessels on the face
  • Acne-like breakouts on the face
  • Watery or irritated eyes

If you recognize any of the warning signs of rosacea, visit your dermatologist for a proper diagnosis. A dermatologist will examine your skin for common warning signs and tailor a treatment plan for your unique condition. Treatment will vary for each individual, ranging from topical medicine, antibiotics and lasers or light treatment. While there is currently no cure, with proper management patients can learn how to avoid triggers, prevent flare-ups and manage their condition to live a healthy, active life.

By Feinstein Dermatology & Cosmetic Surgery
March 14, 2017
Category: Skin Condition
Tags: Psoriasis  

PsoriasisPsoriasis is a common, chronic and often frustrating skin condition that causes skin scaling, inflammation, redness and irritation. The exact cause is unknown, but psoriasis is thought to be caused by an overactive immune system, which causes the skin to form inflamed, scaly lesions. These patches of thick, red skin may be itchy and painful. They are often found on the elbows and knees, but can also form on the scalp, lower back, face and nails.

Symptoms of psoriasis are different for every person and can vary in intensity over time. Some people may even go months or years without symptoms before flare-ups return. Symptoms of psoriasis can manifest in many ways, including:

  • Rough, scaly skin
  • Cracks on fingertips
  • Simple tasks are painful, such as tying your shoe
  • Brown, uneven nails
  • Flaky skin
  • Joint pain or aching
  • Severe itching

The onset of psoriasis can occur at any age, although it most often occurs in adults. The disease is non-contagious and is thought to be genetic. Because psoriasis is a persistent, systemic autoimmune disease, people with psoriasis will have it for a lifetime. Most people who suffer from psoriasis can still lead healthy, active lives with proper management and care. 

Coping with Psoriasis: Your Dermatologist can Help

Currently, there is no cure for psoriasis, but with the help of your dermatologist, you can learn how to cope with the condition, reduce psoriasis symptoms and keep outbreaks under control for an improved quality of life. Treatment depends on how serious the psoriasis is, the type of psoriasis and how the patient responds to certain treatments.

By Feinstein Dermatology & Cosmetic Surgery
February 28, 2017
Category: Skin Condition
Tags: Skin Cancer   Moles  

Although moles are usually harmless, in some cases they can become cancerous, causing melanoma. For this reason, it is important to molesregularly examine your skin for any moles that change in size, color, shape, sensation or that bleed.  Suspicious or abnormal moles or lesions should always be examined by your dermatologist.

What to Look For

Remember the ABCDE's of melanoma when examining your moles. If your mole fits any of these criteria, you should visit your dermatologist as soon as possible.  

  • Asymmetry. One half of the mole does not match the other half.
  • Border. The border or edges of the mole are poorly defined or irregular.
  • Color. The color of the mole is not the same throughout or has shades of tan, brown, black, blue, white or red.
  • Diameter. The diameter of a mole is larger than the eraser of a pencil.
  • Evolution. The mole is changing in size, shape or color.

Moles can appear anywhere on the skin, including the scalp, between the fingers and toes, on the soles of the feet and even under the nails. The best way to detect skin cancer in its earliest, most curable stage is by checking your skin regularly and visiting our office for a full-body skin cancer screening. Use this guide to perform a self-exam.

  • Use a mirror to examine your entire body, starting at your head and working your way to the toes. Also be sure to check difficult to see areas, including between your fingers and toes, the groin, the soles of your feet and the backs of your knees.
  • Pay special attention to the areas exposed to the most sun.
  • Don't forget to check your scalp and neck for moles. Use a handheld mirror or ask a family member to help you.
  • Develop a mental note or keep a record of all the moles on your body and what they look like. If they do change in any way (color, shape, size, border, etc.), or if any new moles look suspicious, visit your dermatologist right away.  

Skin cancer has a high cure rate if detected and treated early. The most common warning sign is a visible change on the skin, a new growth, or a change in an existing mole. Depending on the size and location of the mole, dermatologists may use different methods of mole removal. A body check performed by a dermatologist can help determine whether the moles appearing on the body are pre-cancerous or harmless.