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Posts for category: Skin Condiition

By Feinstein Dermatology
December 03, 2018
Category: Skin Condiition
Tags: Lupus   Sun Sensitivity  

Lupus can affect the skinFind out what this autoimmune disorder means for your skin health.

According to the Lupus Foundation of America, approximately 1.5 million Americans and five million people globally have some form of lupus. While lupus can affect both men and women, about 90 percent of those with diagnosed lupus are women between the ages of 15 to 44. Even though this chronic autoimmune disease affects millions, significantly less than half of people are actually somewhat familiar with the disease. 

So, what exactly is lupus, how can you contract this disorder and what treatment options are available?

About Lupus

Our immune system is meant to attack foreign agents in our body to fight diseases and other infections. However, if you have been diagnosed with lupus then your immune system actually responds by attacking the healthy cells within your body. This ultimately causes damage to certain organs in the body like your heart, skin and brain.

There are different types of lupus; however, the most common form is systemic lupus erythematosis. Discoid lupus is known for causing a persistent skin rash, subacute cutaneous lupus causes skin sores when exposed to the sun, drug­induced lupus is the result of a certain medication and neonatal lupus affects infants.

Know that you aren’t alone when it comes to handling your lupus symptoms. While symptoms can be severe and affect your daily life talk to your dermatologist about the best ways to reduce your symptoms and improve your quality of life.

Lupus Risk Factors

While anyone can develop lupus, women are more likely to develop this condition. Also, African American, Hispanic, Native American and Asian women are at an increased risk over Caucasian women. While the cause is unknown, some research has found that perhaps genes play an influential role in the development of lupus; however, there are several factors that could be at play.

Lupus Symptoms

Those with lupus may experience some or all of these symptoms:

  • Muscle aches and pains
  • Joint pain and swelling
  • Skin rashes, most commonly found on the face
  • Fever
  • Chest pain when breathing deeply
  • Loss of hair
  • Pale fingers and toes
  • Sun sensitivity
  • Mouth sores
  • Extreme fatigue
  • Leg or eye swelling
  • Swollen glands

These symptoms may not be present all the time. Those with lupus have flare­ups in which the symptoms will appear for a little while and then go away. Also new symptoms may also arise at any time.

Lupus Treatments

If you’ve been diagnosed with lupus then you will most likely need to see several specialists regarding your condition. If you are dealing with skin sores and rashes, then you will want to talk to your dermatologist about the best treatment plan for you. About 40 to 70 percent of those with lupus experience symptoms when exposed to sunlight.

When you come in our office for treatment our goal is to find certain medications that can reduce pain, swelling and redness and prevent further flare­ups. Furthermore, we will recommend a sunscreen and other lifestyle changes that can help to protect your skin from damaging sun exposure.

By Feinstein Dermatology
January 15, 2018
Category: Skin Condiition
Tags: Dermatologist  

Chicken PoxWhen your child breaks out all over in a blistery, itchy red rash, there’s a good chance it’s the chicken pox. Chicken pox is caused by the varicella-zoster virus, and although it’s typically a childhood disease, people who have not contracted it as a child can suffer from it in adulthood as well.

Chicken pox is highly contagious and can spread from person to person by direct contact or through the air from an infected person's coughing or sneezing. 

Symptoms of Chicken pox

Itchy red spots or blisters all over the body are telltale signs of chicken pox. It may also be accompanied by a headache, sore throat and fever. Symptoms are generally mild among children, but can cause serious complications in infants, adults and people with weakened immune systems.

The most common symptoms of chicken pox include:

  • Itchy rash all over the body, including the face, on the arms and legs and inside the mouth
  • Fatigue and irritability
  • Fever
  • Feeling of general illness
  • Reduced appetite

The symptoms of chicken pox may resemble other skin problems or medical conditions, so it is always important to consult your child's physician or dermatologist for proper diagnosis. If the chicken pox rash seems generalized or severe, or if the child has a high grade fever or is experiencing a headache or nausea, seek medical care right away.

The incubation period (from exposure to first appearance of symptoms) is 14 to 16 days. When the blisters crust over, they are no longer contagious and the child can return to normal activity. 

Relief for Chicken Pox

It is important not to scratch the blisters as it can slow down the healing process and result in scarring. Scratching may also increase the risk of a bacterial infection. To help relieve the itching, soak in a cool or lukewarm oatmeal bath. A physician may recommend anti-itch ointments or medications, such as over-the-counter antihistamines, to control this troublesome itch.

Although about four million children get chicken pox each year, it may be preventable via a vaccine. Usually one episode of  chicken pox in childhood provides lifelong immunity to the virus.

Fortunately, chicken pox is more of a nuisance than a concern. With time and extra rest, the rash will pass and the child will be good as new! Contact your dermatologist whenever you have questions or concerns about chicken pox.

By Feinstein Dermatology
November 01, 2017
Category: Skin Condiition
Tags: Warts  

Warts are benign skin growths that appear when a virus infects the top layer of the skin. They often appear as a small, unsightly, rough Wart Removalgrowth on a person’s hands or feet, but can also appear on other parts of the body. There are many types of warts, some appearing flat or raised, and others growing in large clusters.

The virus that causes most warts is called human papillomavirus (HPV). Warts are usually harmless, but some strains of HPV are associated with other health complications. Wart viruses are contagious and can spread by direct contact, usually entering the body in an area of broken skin.

When should you see your dermatologist?

In some cases, a wart will disappear on its own, although it may take months or even years. Most people prefer some method of wart removal since warts are often unattractive, bothersome and even painful. In many cases, warts can be treated at home.

Common methods for self-treatment include covering the wart with duct tape or applying salicylic acid. It’s always best to consult your dermatologist before trying any at-home remedies. Wart removal by a trained dermatologist is always the most effective treatment.

The American Academy of Dermatology (AAD) recommends visiting your dermatologist if you have any of the following:

  • Any doubt that the skin growth is a wart, as some skin cancers resemble warts
  • A wart that appears on your face or genitals
  • Several warts
  • A wart that is painful, itchy, burns or bleeds
  • A weak immune system
  • Diabetes

Because HPV is contagious, you’ll want to take a few extra precautions to keep it from spreading, including:

  • Avoid scratching or picking your warts.
  • Always wear shoes in public places such as showers, locker rooms or pools.
  • Never touch another person’s wart.
  • Keep warts on the feet dry to prevent moisture from spreading the virus.

If your warts persist, are painful or if you have several warts, you should visit your dermatologist. There are many treatment options available for warts, including laser treatment or freezing, burning or cutting out the wart, among others. Your dermatologist can help you determine the best treatment option for your specific type of wart.

Since there is no permanent cure for HPV, warts can redevelop. In this case, its best to have your dermatologist treat the new wart as soon as it appears. Warts are a common and frustrating condition affecting both children and adults. Contact our office today and learn how you can wipe out your warts!

By Feinstein Dermatology & Cosmetic Surgery
June 01, 2017
Category: Skin Condiition
Tags: Dry Skin  

Dry SkinCold winds, low temperatures and dry indoor conditions can strip the skin of its natural oils that serve as a natural moisturizer. Although the cold winter months often cause dry skin, with proper skin care habits you can have a healthy complexion that lasts all season long.

You can’t control the harsh winter climate, but you can protect your skin by learning how to manage the factors that trigger dry, flaky skin.

How Can I Protect My Skin from Dryness

For starters, apply a heavy moisturizer or cream daily to help retain moisture and keep skin from drying out. Since strong, brisk winds can cause chapped skin, it is also important to cover exposed areas by wearing a hat, scarf or mittens when going out into the cold air.

Furnaces, radiators and fireplaces that you use to heat your home during cold winter months may feel wonderful in the middle of winter, but they can be extremely drying. To add moisture back into your home, try using a humidifier. Frequent showering and hand washing can also dry out your skin. Keep skin moist with lotion or cream immediately after you shower and wash your hands to seal in moisture.

No matter what season you’re in, if your dry skin becomes inflamed or develops a painful itch, visit our practice for a proper evaluation and treatment plan. A dermatologist can help you modify your current skin regimen accordingly to help your skin stay healthy with the changing seasons.